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  • February 9, 2015

Charlie Ebersol opens up about the life-changing moment that ‘defined’ him

Just days after making his first official public appearance with Britney Spears at Super Bowl XLIX, producer Charlie Ebersol told “Extra” he was “incredibly lucky” about his relationship with the pop superstar.

The two began dating last fall, and when asked for his thoughts on Britney’s sexy ad for her new Intimate lingerie line, Ebersol simply said, “I would say that’s a very accurate depiction of a beautiful blonde woman.”

Ebersol, 32, son of longtime NBC Sports Executive Dick Ebersol and actress Susan Saint James, is one of the survivors of a 2004 plane crash that took the life of his younger brother, Teddy.

Charlie explained, “It defines who I am,” revealing his mom gave him two important pieces of advice after the crash. “The first thing she said was, ‘You can be sad, but you can’t be mad sad,’ and my mom also said, ‘What you’re going to do with your life, you have to choose things that you love, not confuse things you’re good at for things you love.’

His mother’s wise words inspired the mission statement for Ebersol’s production company: “We will only create content that creates joy, happiness, and change.”

Ebersol’s latest project delivers on all three fronts. He is executive producer of “NFL Characters Unite,” an annual documentary series that pairs NFL superstars who faced adversity in their youth, with young kids facing similar troubles today.

Charlie, who revealed he was a victim of bullying in his own childhood, said, “The premise of the show is that we take the superstars, and we introduce them to kids who are going through the exact same thing the player went through when they were a kid, and the player helps the kid.”

The philanthropist is also teaming up with First Lady Michelle Obama and Bradley Cooper for the “Got Your 6” campaign, designed to “encourage the entertainment industry to portray veterans responsibly.”

Ebersol added, “When World War II ended, all these troops came home and the economy exploded because we saw them for what they were: highly trained, motivated people. Then, when the Iraq and Afghanistan wars are ending… Americans [are treating the troops coming home] as more of a burden than a benefit. We want to honor the movies and TV shows that do a good job of telling accurate veteran stories.”